Brewing Coffee – Tips For the Best Pot Ever

There is nothing like the smell of freshly brewed coffee in the morning. You drink it every morning. It awakens your senses, perks you up, and rejuvenates you for a long day ahead.

Coffee making is not a rocket science, but making a perfect cup is a combination of art and finesse.

You can acquire the expertise of coffee making if you keep a few things in mind while brewing your perfect cup of joe. Here are some of the tips which will help you make the best pot ever.

The first thing is to buy a good coffee maker. With various brands and models available in the market, it is often difficult to figure out what to buy, so the best way to avoid this confusion is to shortlist some products, go through the online reviews of these analyzing their key features, additional features, and pros and cons, etc., before making a choice.

The most important ingredient in coffee making is beans. It is best to buy whole beans and grind them just before use. Although, it is quite a tedious thing rather than using a teaspoon or 2 of coffee powder, but the difference in taste is the reward of your hard work.

If your coffee still doesn’t taste good, water maybe the culprit. Try using bottled or mineral water instead of tap water. Moreover, there are coffee makers with upgraded patented filters which filter out any taste-affecting particles from the water and offer you a perfect cup.

As the disposable paper filters contain bleach, chlorine, and dyes, it can also affect the taste of your beverage. Try replacing your old paper filter with a stainless steel or gold mesh filter.

The secret recipe for a perfect cup is 2 tablespoons of coffee per 6 ounces of water. Try using this ratio for the best pot ever.

Reheating can alter the taste of the brewed coffee. Most of the machines have timers that keep the coffee warm until it is consumed. If you don’t have one, pour your coffee into a stainless steel thermal flask which will keep it warm.

Cleaning and descaling of the coffee pot is a crucial step in enjoying a perfectly brewed coffee. If your machine doesn’t have autocleaning and descaling feature inbuilt, you need to clean the decanter at the end of the day. The easiest way to do this is by throwing the used paper filters and any remnants of the coffee immediately as it will affect the taste when a new batch of coffee is prepared the next day. The rest of the machine should be dismantled and each part cleaned with water and some vinegar if there are any hard stains.

Don’t use stale coffee for brewing. Although it is still safe to drink, one must not use the coffee beyond its freshness date.

These are the few tips to experience the rich flavour of freshly brewed coffee as though it was bought from your favorite cafe

Coffee Cultures From Around The World

offee Cultures From Around The World

Here in the UK, we’ve developed a taste in recent years for cappuccinos, lattes, espressos and mochas that just a few decades ago, were completely absent from the High Street. As a result, many people assume this is how the rest of the world drink their coffee and some get a real shock when they travel abroad to find that their request for their favourite skinny caramel latte is met with a blank expression!

So how is coffee consumed in other countries around the world? We’ve taken some countries at random where coffee is taken seriously, and compared them to ourselves. Take a look and see how varied some of these coffee cultures are, and feel free to let us know about your own experiences when travelling overseas.

1. France Caf� au Lait

This famous drink (simply coffee served with hot milk in a mug or large cup) made it to the shores of the UK some time ago. This is consumed at breakfast time, and is traditionally served in a cup wide enough to allow a croissant to be dunked in. Available pretty much anywhere and about as basic as a coffee recipe can be (except for the croissant of course). They have joined the rest of the world in recent years, with the familiar Starbucks outlets in every major town.

2. Italy Cappuccino, Latte, Mocha, Ristretto, Macchiato

It’s fair to say that the Italians know a bit about coffee, and are responsible for many of the Italian-sounding concoctions you’ll see in any branch of Costa. Not that you’ll find a branch of Costa in Italy though, they don’t do chains of coffee shops, preferring family run bars and cafes instead. They don’t actually drink latte (which literally just means ‘milk’) and rarely add syrups, whipped cream and other such flavourings, preferring instead to drink mostly espressos.

Most of the best known brands of coffee beans are Italian, such as Lavazza, Segafredo and Illy.

And don’t order a cappuccino after midday unless you want the barista to roll his eyes or just point-blank refuse – it’s considered to be something only drunk at breakfast time, usually with a sweet croissant or pastry. After midday, it’s espresso or macchiato unless you’re a tourist.

3. Turkey

Turkish coffee is rarely seen in the UK, mainly because it’s so far removed from what we here would call a cup of coffee. It’s usually served from a long-handled copperpot in small cups about the size of an espresso, and is thick, black and extremely sweet. Turkish citizens who come here to live or work in the UK won’t find any coffee widely available that will remind them of home, and so they often drink espresso or ristretto with lots of sugar, or simply make traditional Turkish coffee themselves at home.

4. Cuba

Another nation that prefers its coffee thick and strong is Cuba. Here though, it’s very much a social event consumed in a similar way to alcoholic shots, but in no way limited to the evenings. Many Cubans enjoy their coffee first thing in the morning, throughout the day and particularly after meals. It’s not quite as strong as the Turkish brew however, and is quite acceptable to Europeans palates.

5. Ethiopia

The Ethiopians should know a bit about coffee – their country is the birthplace of the stuff. They do take it pretty seriously too, with the traditional brewing process of ‘Buna’ as it’s known, taking anything up to 2 hours. It’s a social thing here, drunk with guests and friends and served with salt or butter instead of milk (which isn’t always available).

Many other countries drink their coffee in forms that would seem strange to us here in the UK. In Japan for instance, coffee in cans is extremely popular and has been for decades. It’s available from vending machines in both hot and cold forms, allowing busy commuters the chance to grab one on the go.

In Saudi Arabia and other Arabic cultures, coffee ceremonies follow many rules of etiquette, including always serving the elders first. It is also a common custom to serve this a cardamom-spiced coffee with dried fruit such as dates, partly to compensate for the bitterness of the coffee.

In Mexico, Caf� de olla is a spiced coffee brewed with cinnamon sticks in earthenware pots. Not to everyone’s taste, the Mexicans say it brings out the taste of the coffee. Each to their own of course!

In Vietnam, they have been drinking iced coffee for years. Unlike us, however, they like theirs made with very dark roasted beans and sweetened using condensed milk.

Australia. Ever since an influx of Italian immigrants after World War 2, Australians have been drinking coffee like the Italians and enjoying a real caf� culture of their own. The now world famous flat white originated here (see our article on how to make one), though don’t mention this if you are visiting New Zealand – they also claim to have invented it!

Last but not least, our cousins in the US are prolific coffee drinkers thanks to chains such as Starbucks. While the menu in a US branch of Starbucks is little different to one here, they do like filter coffee more than we do, and take their frappes and iced drinks with far more cream, sugar and chocolate sauce than many European countries.

It seems that no two countries have exactly the same taste when it comes to coffee, and this should be considered a good thing. We have absorbed a wide variety coffee drinks from Italy, France, Australia and the USA, and if we hadn’t, we might still all be drinking instant!

What to Cook Your Vegetarian Guest

Are you used to making the same dishes that your family enjoys for dinner like meat loaf, chicken, or hamburgers? You have entertained many times before and are probably a great cook. But now a vegetarian is coming over for dinner. Some people don’t make anything special for vegetarians and let them eat what they can find to eat like side dishes. But you want to be a good host and make a main dish your vegetarian guest will enjoy.

Some people can be nervous about asking their guests who are coming to dinner what they like or don’t like to eat. If you don’t know what vegetarians eat ask your guests ahead of time what they eat. First of all it helps to know what kind of vegetarian they are.The ovo-lacto vegetarian eats eggs and dairy, the ovo vegetarian eats eggs, but no dairy, the lacto vegetarian eats dairy, but no eggs, and the vegan doesn’t eat eggs or dairy. People who eat fish and no other meat are called pescatarians and are not vegetarians. Many people have been misinformed that fish is a vegetarian food, which it is not. You don’t want to be one of the people making this mistake. Finding out what kind of vegetarian your guest is is a big step towards figuring out what to make for them.

Ask your guests what dishes they like. This is good advice for guests who are not vegetarian also because it will assure that the guest will like what dish you make. Vegetarians are used to people asking what they eat so they often have dishes to suggest.

If your guest has no suggestions the internet is a great place to look for recipes. You can also find a section of vegetarian cookbooks at your local library or bookstore. Some vegetarian recipes call for hard to find ingredients that are not carried at the average grocery store and that may be foreign to you. If you are not used to cooking vegetarian foods stick to some of the easier recipes using common ingredients.

Don’t be intimidated by making vegetarian recipes. Vegetarians eat many of the same dishes people who eat meat enjoy, minus the meat. Vegetarians like spaghetti, macaroni, rice, beans, burgers (veggie burgers), sandwiches, pizza, and many other dishes you already make and enjoy. You can make these same dishes listed, but simply don’t add the meat. Is it that simple? Well almost. If using any mix, dip, spread, soup, or anything you didn’t make from scratch read the ingredients. Some cornbread muffin mixes and soups have meat in them and some dips and spreads may have dairy or eggs in them even though they may not taste like it.

With these tips you are ready to host a vegetarian for dinner. You are probably already a great cook so it won’t be hard to use these skills to make a vegetarian meal. Your vegetarian guest will probably be more than happy to help provide suggestions on great vegetarian dishes. But if you want to plan a meal by yourself you are now prepared to look online for easy recipes or just make one of your favorite dishes sans the meat. Start getting ready for that next party or get together.

Garden Crisp Salad and the Secret Formula to Create Your Own Homemade Salad Recipes

Salads are universal. Asia, Europe, America… just about anywhere you go, salads are part of the menu. Perhaps because they’re simple to prepare. Toss in some greens into a bowl, add your favorite fruits, and voila! Your homemade salad is ready to serve.

However, salad preparation isn’t just about throwing in all sorts of vegetables and fruits into a dish. Ever noticed buffet diners dumping just about every ingredient at the salad bar unto their plate? It’s not a very pretty picture. You wouldn’t want to be serving a heap of whatnot to your guests, would you?

Fret not. Creating your own homemade salad recipe is actually effortless and fun. Here is a secret formula to salad-making dubbed as The Three T’s. And what better way to talk about it than to prepare a straightforward salad recipe.

Garden Crisp Salad

Main ingredients:

1 cucumber (sliced thinly)

1 carrot (sliced into thin strips)

Optional ingredients:

1/4 lettuce

1/4 grapefruit (chopped)

1/2 turnip (sliced into thin strips)

1 hardboiled egg (sliced thinly)

Thai pat sauce or your choice of dressing

Recipe 1: Mix main ingredients into a bowl. Top with your favorite dressing.

Recipe 2: Mix all the ingredients, excluding lettuce and sauce/dressing. Set aside. Arrange leaves of lettuce on a salad dish. Place the mixed ingredients on top of the lettuce. Top with sauce or dressing.

The Three T’s

Tint. Cuisine is a creative endeavor. Enticing your guests to try out your personal recipe highly depends on the aesthetic appeal of the final product. Salads don’t really carry an aroma, so you will have to do with visuals to whet their appetite. Imagine yourself as a painter and your ingredients as your palette of colors or art materials.

Garden Crisp Salad Recipe 1 is a simple, yet ideal example, of using tint when selecting ingredients. In contrast, Garden Crisp Salad Recipe 2 is a feast of pastel colors. Nevertheless, the varying shades are well-balanced and pleasing to the eye.

Texture. Apart from color, texture adds to the palatable experience. It tells a lot about the freshness of ingredients-something you cannot disguise. Although texture appeals mostly to the sense of touch, it also makes your dish visually interesting.

Both recipes balance out the crisp and tenderness of each ingredient. Balancing isn’t a must. In fact, you can serve a bowl of mangoes and peaches, which are tender, and it would still be great. Feel free to experiment until you find just the right touch for your homemade recipe.

Taste. So you’ve enticed your guests with their sense of sight. It’s time to hit the spot right where it matters. Behind all the fancy aesthetics, food is really about flavor. No matter how attractive a dish is, you have to get the taste right. It is the make it or break it point.

Both recipes are pretty safe when it comes to taste. It gets tricky with the sauce and dressing. Some overwhelm their salads with thick, rich dressings. Others just want a hint of spice and tang.

For the sample recipes above, the Garden Crisp Salad is meant to be easy to the senses. Ideally, a small amount of sauce will do the trick.

With The Three T’s formula, you can have fun exploring the many homemade salad recipes you can create. It will be a great way to surprise your family, neighbors, or coworkers on the next celebration!

Foods Necessary to Keep the Lungs Healthy

Indoor and outdoor air pollution affects our lungs on a daily basis. It is especially important for people who suffer from lung illnesses such as asthma or emphysema to take care of their lungs. Fortunately, there are several foods that are scientifically proven to keep your lungs in good shape.

Water- Nothing can live without water in some form or another. Water can help in a variety of ways. Drinking water helps soothe throat irritation and makes it more comfortable to talk, sing, or shout. These activities are vital because they exercise our lungs by pushing air in and out of our bodies at different rates, expanding and retracting our lung muscles and working the diaphragm. When a chest cold comes on, inhaling steam from a hot shower can help break up congestion in the sinuses and lungs, making it easier to breathe. Just drinking more water helps the body recover from illnesses that affect the lungs such as influenza and stops it from becoming pneumonia.

Carrots, Apricots, and Oranges- These orange colored snacks contain cancer fighting vitamin A which is important for repairing the lining of the lungs and the windpipe preventing lung infections which can be deadly for children with asthma. They also contain a good amount of vitamin C, an anti-oxidant which also has been linked to better lung function. It helps rid the body of toxins including what the lungs have inhaled throughout the day. Oranges contain iron which transfers oxygen to the bloodstream faster. Red and orange fruits and vegetables also contain carotenoids which have been known to assist in the prevention of lung cancer. All of these fruits and vegetables can be tossed into a salad for an easy lunch.

Onions- One of the cheapest and most variable vegetables is also one of the healthiest. Some experts consider onions a super food. It contains vitamins C, an antioxidant, B, which fights cancer, and queretin which helps prevent lung disease. Almost anything cooked on a stove requires onions for flavoring. They are excellent in stir fry, on top of meat, or deep fried in batter as onion rings.

Meat, Fish, and Eggs- Protein is an essential nutrient to every part of the body as it helps rebuild tissue and keep the respiratory muscles going even under distress. Fish contains fatty acids that reduce inflammation and healthy fats to maintain good muscle health. Most of these contain B vitamins which research suggests reduces the risk of lung cancer. For vegetarians and vegans, beans and fortified cereals are an important part of a healthy lung diet.

Dark Leafy Vegetables- Cruciferous vegetables like kale and broccoli have shown that they can reduce the risk of lung cancer by as much as half. They contain B vitamins like meat and eggs but are also rich in antioxidants which dispel pollution from the body. Out of all the dark green vegetables, broccoli is known to be the most beneficial when it comes to lung function.

How To Make A Flat White Coffee

Flat White has been appearing in our coffee shops over the last couple of years and seems to be growing in popularity. So what is it exactly?

It’s an espresso-based drink from Australia (but perfected in New Zealand), currently spreading around the world and becoming particularly popular in the US. This is surprising as many Americans are used to Starbucks-style coffee which can taste harsh to the European and Australian palate, but it seems the Americans are coming round!

Flat White

There are several things about the flat white that are in sharp contrast to Starbucks coffee. First is the rich and velvety texture of the flat white, and the second being the size of the serving, typically a 5.5fl.oz cup rather than the 20oz monsters served in some outlets. However, they say sometimes it’s quality that is more important that quantity, and this is a perfect example. The massive ‘venti’ drinks can be like drinking a pint of hot coffee-flavoured milk (this is exactly what it is after all), whereas the flat white is a far more subtle balance of smooth milk and coffee blended together.

So how do I make a flat white?

You’ll need the following ingredients. Please beware of substituting any of these or skipping parts that you don’t think are important – the flat white is a subtle drink and needs to be made properly to avoid it tasting just like any other coffee.

Use good quality fresh coffee beans, not roasted too dark (unless you have a strong preference otherwise). Something like a Lavazza Super Crema or an equivalent Illy / Segafredo will be just right. Avoid using cheap beans or anything that has been sitting around for a while, it will ruin the finished drink.

Grind the coffee beans to espresso grind just before making your flat white.

Heat a 165ml ceramic coffee cup – this doesn’t have to be exact but refrain from using anything that’s very much bigger or smaller if at all possible.

Make a double shot of espresso, avoiding over extraction which wil result in a more bitter flavour. If you’re using a traditional espresso machine, make your espresso on the strong side. If you’re using a capsule or pod machine such as a Lavazza Modo Mio, then limit the amount of water dispensed slightly more than you normally would.

Whole milk. Please don’t use semi skimmed or skimmed milk, it simply won’t work! If you’re on a diet, then avoid flat whites and stick with a skinny cappuccino.

Milk. This part is arguably the most important and is what differentiates a flat white from other milky coffees. The perfect milk for a flat white should not have any of the dry foam on top of it that is typical for making a caffe latte or cappuccino. The term used for what you do to the milk is “stretching”. This is achieved by keeping the tip of the steaming wand slightly lower into the milk than usual so as not to break the surface of the milk at all. Your aim is not to introduce air into the milk. The heating of the milk and circulation of the milk in the frothing jug will result in the milk becoming stretched. The volume should more than double in size and the milk should appear somewhat glassy and shiny when done. The milk should be heated to approximately 60� C / 140� F.

If you are using a coffee machine at home that doesn’t foam milk, don’t worry. An alternative is to use a hand-held electric milk frother, though the same principle still applies – make sure you don’t break the surface of the milk, and if necessary fold the milk at the end.

If you’ve got it right first time, your milk will have no dry foam on the top. Once you’ve got your milk ready, pull your espresso. Just before pouring the milk, bang the bottom of the milk jug onto a towel or cloth on your work surface to break any large air bubbles in the milk, and swirl the jug round a couple of times. Gently and carefully pour the milk into the espresso so that the crema from the coffee sits on top of the milk.

If you’ve done this and ended up with silky milk in your cup with a crema on top, then congratulations, you’ve just made a flat white! Like most things, practice makes perfect so the more you make this, the more you will refine your technique. It won’t be long before you’re making them without thinking about it, and then you can start getting clever with latte art if you want to really show off!

If you’ve never seen latte art stencils before, ours look at our range – they’re a great investment and last pretty much forever.

Make Your Own Tomato Juice

If you love tomatoes, you’ll enjoy a glass of tomato juice. This is especially true if it’s freshly made by you with fresh, ripe tomatoes. Making tomato juice is not as difficult as you might think. Follow the instructions below and you’ll be drinking homemade tomato juice in no time.

What You’ll Need

Tomatoes
Lemon juice
Jar funnel
Jar grabber
Large pot
Spoons and ladle
Pressure canner
Canning jars
New lids and rings

What to Do

Step #1: Choose your tomatoes. The best ones to use for juice are beefsteak, Roma, Lemon Boy, and Better Boy. You need about 23 pounds for 7 quarts or 14 pounds for 9 pints.

Once you have your tomatoes, wash them, slice off the bruises and remove the stems.

Step #2: Wash the jars and lids. While you don’t need to sanitize them, it’s a good idea to do it. You can simply place them in the dishwasher on the sanitizing cycle.

Step #3: Cut up the tomatoes and place them into the pot. You can use a juicer, but there’s a higher likelihood the juice will separate when you use it.

Heat the tomatoes in the pot until boiling. Crush the tomatoes as they are heating up and boiling. While the tomatoes are boiling and you’re crushing them, add more tomatoes to the pot.

Step #4: Simmer the tomatoes for five minutes after you’ve added all the tomatoes.

Step #5: Use a sieve to remove all the skin and seeds from the tomatoes in the pot. Put the tomatoes back in the pot and heat it up again.

Step #6: In each jar, add two tablespoons of lemon juice. For seasoning, you can also add one teaspoon of salt to each jar. Once you’ve done that, simply pour the tomatoes into the jars. Make sure to leave at least a � inch at the top for expanding room.

Step #7: The last step is to can them using a pressure canner or a water bath. It usually takes about 10 to 20 minutes. Once the canning is done, you just have to let it cool to room temperature or place in the fridge. You can then store your canned tomato juice.

Seasoning is everything with tomato juice. For more flavor, you can add herbs to it such as basil or parsley. As you get better at canning tomato juice, you’ll find a combination of seasoning that gives you the best tasting juice. It will be juice you can’t find anywhere else because it’s your very own.

Cold Soups or Hot Soups, Which One is The Ideal Meal

There are many soups that are called “comfort foods” and this is because there really is nothing that can compare to the feeling of cradling a warm vessel of delicious soup in your hands on a cold day. However, soup is also a summer food when you make it with fresh vegetables and sip it cold under a shady tree.

Additionally, the smoothie craze has led more and more people to give a lot of different cold soups a try as well because they are often quite close in taste and texture to healthy smoothies.

Just think of that wildly popular favorite known as gazpacho. This is something that usually has very little salt and relies instead on the freshest herbs, garlic, vegetables, and a bit of healthy vinegar to give it zing. Whether eaten as a snack, a meal substitute, or the first course of a larger meal, it is one of the cleanest and most invigorating foods you can ever experience. It is, as many say, “like drinking a summer day”.

Naturally, many people want a nutritious hot soup as well, and though cooking and processing can decrease the nutrient counts of some foods, there are ways to still enjoy the pleasures of warm and hot soups while also getting a lot of “bang” for the buck. For instance, the classic miso soup recipes can deliver a high number of enzymes, nutrients, and loads of protein. Whether enjoyed with or without noodles, these hot or warm soups really give a ton of nutrition.

If you are more concerned with fiber, you can get a classic “cream” soup by using roasted or boiled potatoes (or other starchy vegetables) and pureeing them for a soup base. This would allow you to gently heat the mixture, rather than boiling it and killing off a lot of enzymes. You could make everything from a creamy broccoli mixture to a classic “chowder” without the dairy and fat. Bean soups work in this way as well, and you can easily puree half of the cooked beans to make an amazingly “creamy” result. Blending beans really adds flavor and texture and is a “trade secret” of vegetarian and vegan soup fans.

We suggest you have a good mix of hot and cold soup recipes on hand. These should put an emphasis on cold soups because it means that they are, technically, “raw” and full of enzymes and nutrients in a way that cooked and processed foods just cannot be.

Like all foods and recipes, however, you do want your soups to be made from the finest whole and fresh foods. While it can be tempting to purchase vegetables that are not in prime condition, thinking that because they are going into the soup pot their “ugliness” won’t matter, but just think of the nutrition they have already lost. You want food to bring vitality and to do that it needs to be made from the best ingredients. The keys are fresh, organic, and local (whenever possible).

What Can You Make With Yogurt

While good on its own, yogurt makes a useful ingredient in the kitchen. With the exception of a decreased sugar content and a higher acidity, yogurt may serve as a replacement for milk in many instances. Replacing milk with yogurt, allows those with lactose intolerance to enjoy foods they otherwise wouldn’t be able to.

Yogurt in Sauces around the World

The proteins in yogurt act differently than those found in milk. Pasteurizing milk, prior to making yogurt, results in proteins that do not curd and that hold water better. Both make for a smoother texture to yogurt; which makes great sauces.

A large percentage of India’s population is vegetarian, and yogurt holds an important place in Indian cuisine. In addition to lentils and beans, yogurt provides an important source of protein for the populace. India sees the use of yogurt in sauces often. Each region in India has its own way of cooking kadhi, yogurt-based curry.
Punjabi kadhi is made with ginger, garlic, coriander, turmeric, cumin, and garam masala and famously contains pakodas, fried chickpea flour dumplings.
Greek cuisine takes advantage of yogurt by combining it with cucumber and garlic to produce tzatziki. which is frequently used over gyros or as a dip for pita bread.
Turkey has an equivalent sauce called cacik.

Yogurt in Desserts

In the southern states of India, it’s not uncommon to see a mix of sweetened yogurt and rice at the end of the meal. The dish is used to cool the tongue after consuming spicy foods, and cool the body from the hot and humid climates.

In Greece, yogurt is eaten with nuts and honey for a sweet snack.

Replacing milk or cream with a yogurt alternative is oftentimes a beneficial solution for sugar-sensitive individuals. The overall flavor and creamy texture is preserved with the exchange from milk to yogurt. Frozen yogurt is a popular treat to replace ice cream.

Yogurt On-The-Go

Additionally, yogurt is often sold in single servings as a highly nutritious snack, or meal on-the-go. It contains a great number of vitamins that snacking can sometimes leave out of the diet. It also offers a balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates. For these reasons, yogurt makes a fine substitute for meals, as well as a bridge between them. The addition of fruits to yogurt is delicious and common, and makes for a refreshing flavor, though the need for refrigeration with fruit is greater than with plain yogurt.

Freeze Dried

Freeze-dried yogurt snacks go a step further: yogurt preserved in this manner may safely be stored without refrigeration for long periods of time. In addition, the beneficial bacterial strains they contain will persist after the freeze drying process. The probiotic effects these bacteria contain are safely retained without much effort. It is very helpful to freeze-dry yogurt, and the cultures they contain, if you are not going to consume them for a long period of time.

As you can see, yogurt can be used in a wide variety of recipes from sauces, to desserts, to wholesome snacks. It is a healthy and delicious choice that provides the nutrients and bacteria to benefit the body.